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The 2nd Sorrowful Mystery

7

August 20, 2013 by mattfradd


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The Rosary,” wrote Blessed Pope John Paul II, “precisely because it starts with Mary’s own experience, is an exquisitely contemplative prayer. Without this contemplative dimension, it would lose its meaning.”

Pope Paul VI wrote that “without [this contemplation,] the Rosary is a body without a soul, and its recitation is in danger of becoming a mechanical repetition of formulas and of going counter to the warning of Christ: ‘And in praying do not heap up empty phrases as the Gentiles do; for they think that they will be heard for their many words’ (Mt 6:7).’”

Because of this, it is vital that Christians familiarize themselves with the Scriptures in order to meditate on the mysteries of the life of Christ.

Below is the second sorrowful mystery. To see other mysteries, click here.

The Scourging (Matthew 27:26)

Jesus, having now been arrested, was sent to Pontius Pilate who after questioning him and finding not guilt in him, hoped to free Jesus through the custom of releasing one prisoner on the feast of the Passover. Having been given the option between Jesus and a man named Barabbas, they crowds chose Barabbas, who is described in the Gospels as a murderer (Lk 23:19), and a robber (Jn 18:40).  After this Pilate had Jesus scourged.

Insight

We see in Wisdom, chapter two a prophecy of the hatred and cruelty displayed in the scourging at the pillar:

“Let us lie in wait for the righteous man, because he is inconvenient to us and opposes our actions; he reproaches us for sins against the law, and accuses us of sins against our training.

He professes to have knowledge of God, and calls himself a child of the Lord. He became to us a reproof of our thoughts; the very sight of him is a burden to us,because his manner of life is unlike that of others, and his ways are strange.

We are considered by him as something base, and he avoids our ways as unclean; he calls the last end of the righteous happy, and boasts that God is his father.

Let us see if his words are true, and let us test what will happen at the end of his life; for if the righteous man is God’s son, he will help him, and will deliver him from the hand of his adversaries. Let us test him with insult and torture, that we may find out how gentle he is, and make trial of his forbearance.

Personal Application

The mystery of the scourging at the pillar reminds Christians that they were not created for comfort but for heaven. “The world will offer you comfort,” said Pope Benedict XVI, “but you were not made for comfort you were made for greatness.”

In denying our flesh certain goods such as food, entertainment, fine clothes etc. We prepare ourselves to face greater trials which require us to be self-sacrificing.

7 thoughts on “The 2nd Sorrowful Mystery

  1. I was greatly touched and inspired after reading your encounter published in the July edition of The Word Among Us. Can you kindly send me your email so that you become my councellor? I am also blessed by this site on the Rosary, i will use it to further my catholic evangelism on the Mysteries. Thanks and God Bless.

  2. […] Wager Revisited – Bob Kurland Pope Francis: Faith and Violence are Incompatible! – Jean Heimann The Scourging at the Pillar – Matt Frad, Catholic Apologist Channeling Jesus on Aisle 5 – Michelle, Catholic Sistas […]

  3. Brian Kelly says:

    The translation you use is not a translation, but an interpolation. The verse in Wisdom ought to read “He calls Himself the Son of God,” not “a child of God.” The Douay, as in the Septuagint, uses the definite article “the” and the word “son” not “child.” Furthermore, the indefinite article “a” gives no prophecy and is not Messianic. The Vulgate has it: et filium Dei se nominat.

  4. Denise says:

    Hi matt,

    Can you write an article in detail on “why should catholics pray the rosary”? Though i’m a catholic myself, i have a hard time believing in the power of rosary that is claimed to heal, comfort and lead us closer to Jesus. And if you dont mind could u include the history of the rosary and when was is officially set as a prayer in the church?

    You see, i’ve talked to a protestant pastor once. And he asked questions that still burns at the back of my mind til now – 1) why do we ask Mary to pray for us if we can directly pray to God?
    2) Would Mary be able to convince God to answer our prayer?
    3) and he also said that asking the dead ie the saints to pray for us is not biblical as opposed to asking a friend who is alive to pray for us…i didnt know that can be found in the bible, do you?

    I really hope you can help me clear my doubts about Mary and the rosary.

    May God always bless you with wisdom and humility to preach His Word in spirit and in truth! 🙂

    Sister in Christ,
    Denise

    • arnold says:

      1 we asked mother Mary to intercede for us. the prayer of a righteous person is very efficacious James 5:16. ask the pastor why do protestants pray for one another if they can go directly to Jesus.
      2 would the pastor who prays for his congregation be able to convince God also.
      3 the saints are not dead but fully alive in the kingdom of God “‘I am the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob’? He is not the God of the dead but of the living. Can be found on Matthew 22:32
      4 and most importantly pray hard to Jesus to increase your faith.

      • Denise says:

        Hmmm..i suppose you are right, Arnold. I will. Do pray for me too as i search for the truth. Thanks!

  5. […] Pope Paul VI wrote that “without [this contemplation,] the Rosary is a body without a soul, and its recitation is in danger of becoming a mechanical repetition of formulas and of going counter to the warning of Christ: ‘And in praying do not heap up empty phrases as the Gentiles do; for they think that they will be heard for their many words’ (Mt 6:7).’”…more […]

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